For The Consortium

Participating Institutions

Sarah S. Murray, Ph.D., director of genetics at Scripps Translational Science Institute in San Diego, directs a high-throughput genotyping laboratory aimed at discovering genetic components of health as well as disease, and determining disease risk profiles based on combinations of specific risk alleles in large prospective studies.

Sarah S. Murray, Ph.D., director of genetics at Scripps Translational Science Institute in San Diego, directs a high-throughput genotyping laboratory aimed at discovering genetic components of health as well as disease, and determining disease risk profiles based on combinations of specific risk alleles in large prospective studies.

The Scripps Translational Science Institute

La Jolla, CA

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Principal Investigator: Eric J. Topol, M.D.

Participating Institutions and Community Partners:
Highlights:
The Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) accelerates “integration and innovation” by emphasizing three dimensions of translation: traditional bench to bedside, bedside to bench and back to bedside, and bedside to the community and the practice of medicine. Among STSI’s programs are the annual The Future of Genomic Medicine conferences, to bring together today’s leaders in science and medicine with the young physicians and bench scientists now being trained to be our next generation leaders in translational science; the Wellderly Study, to identify the genetic underpinnings of healthy aging; and the Scripps Genomic Health Initiative, to evaluate individuals’ response to direct-to-consumers personalized genomic risk assessments.  Taking advantage of the abundance of technology innovators and life sciences companies in San Diego, STSI also is advancing research in digital wireless medicine in partnership with the West Wireless Health Institute.  Among achievements of STSI-sponsored research is the identification of genetic variants that prevent the metabolism of an often-prescribed anti-platelet drug. By screening for these gene variants, physicians now can identify patients who should be treated with an alternative medication to prevent blood clots.

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